Development

Congratulations! You have a beautiful, shiny new website that has many bells and quite a few whistles. It got launched on time and under budget! Phew, thankfully that is over and done with…

Er, not really.

You could let it sit on the world wide web and do its thing. “Build it and they will come” and all that – but seriously, your shiny new website does need to be maintained. It needs to be polished; it needs to be updated; it needs to be managed to ensure you are getting the best possible return on your investment.

Postman started out as an API development tool, but has developed more into, as they put it, an “API Development Environment”.

An over-simplified description is it allows you to create and save requests to test your API. You can then save your requests as a collection and share or publish them for others to use.

API Platform makes it easy to deliver all properties of an entity, but what about when you want to limit what properties are accessible to either GET or POST/PUT operations?

It’s surprisingly an easy bit of configuration.

What about dynamically limiting access to properties based on something like the user’s role?

This requires creating a service class, but it is still very approachable.

This article will cover:

API Platform is a Symfony based framework for API-driven projects.

With a minimal amount of configuration after installation, you can have a fully functional REST server with an OpenAPI based Swagger front-end for exploring the API.

How the mobile web will rule the world.

Nowadays to make a purchase all you need to do is reach into your pocket and load up any website. You carry a shopping mall with you all day, that is why a responsive website with an e-commerce solution is of paramount importance.

Here’s an infographic with important statistics about the usage of Mobile Web and Mobile E-commerce in 2013.

Drupal Ecommerce Infographic

A codebase can end up with a bunch of unused modules one way or another. Identifying unused/installed modules is tough, but identifying unused/disabled modules is pretty easy.

Modules and their status exist in the system table of Drupal. It's simple enough to query for disabled modules, but that will return results of modules which may have already been removed from the codebase.

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