Drupal

Should You Standardize on a Single CMS?

There’s too little conversation about standardization regarding content management systems (CMS), and too much business value lost in not considering it. We’ve written an eBook discussing the topic, but how do you know if standardizing is right for you?

The key to success with any web project – from app design to a new site build to adding interactive functionality – starts with intention. To create a more purposeful web, it’s important to challenge clients who know what they want but not what they need.

With any project – big or small, rescue or new – we start our process with a Discovery.

The Discovery process is simple – it’s an open, straightforward conversation that uncovers two important pieces of information:

No one wants to be the person who invested hundreds of thousands of their company’s dollars into a new website, app or digital asset, and then have it fail to do what it was built to do.

Even fewer people want to be the ones to then tell their management team that the project needs even more investment – sometimes as much as the initial expenditure – to fix the problems; or worse, start over.

In the web industry, we call this a rescue. They are every bit as horrible as they sound, but there’s good news. They can be prevented.

What’s the difference between Drupal and WordPress? Why would a business choose one over the other? Once you’ve seen one Content Management System (CMS), you’ve seen them all, right? These are some of the most common questions we hear from prospects and clients. Unfortunately, there is not a winner-takes-all answer here. Sometimes Drupal is a better fit for the project and sometimes WordPress is a better fit.

At Thinkbean, we want to issue a challenge.

We want our clients and prospective clients, developers, partners, and even the competition, to create intention when developing new web properties, apps or digital tools. Yes, there are wonderful digital experiences to be had; we just happen to think all digital experiences should be wonderful.

I run PHP 7 by default on my laptop. For new projects, I typically use Symfony or Drupal 8, and launch the built-in servers with bin/console server:run or drupal server respectively.

For legacy sites that require PHP 5, I have PHP installed in /usr/local/php56/bin and use nginx w/php-fpm to serve them. For these sites, I need to run drush under PHP 5, but PHP 7 is setup as default via the command line.

My solution for this is pretty simple, create an alias named drush5.

What is web accessibility?

It refers to practicing good web standards to design, and develop websites, that are accessible to everyone. By removing any barriers that prevent people with disabilities to interact or access the site.

Web content accessibility guidelines (WCAG) was created to help standardize web content. It's very important because it focuses on the user goals instead of current technologies.

A codebase can end up with a bunch of unused modules one way or another. Identifying unused/installed modules is tough, but identifying unused/disabled modules is pretty easy.

Modules and their status exist in the system table of Drupal. It's simple enough to query for disabled modules, but that will return results of modules which may have already been removed from the codebase.

The Acquia Certified Professional Program launched in March of 2014 and it's a pretty big deal. These exams are ;considered the gold standard for Drupal Developers.

The Acquia Certified Developer Exam consists of 60 questions and takes about 90 minutes to complete. It’s available online and at test centers around the world. The online version of the test can be taken in a proctored, online environment through Webassessor.

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