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What Does UX Have to Do With Web Development? Everything!

What is User Experience (UX)?

A website is like a garden. You have to water and tend a garden if you want it to be productive and enjoyable. A website’s user experience is the same way. It has to be carefully designed and constructed with the user in mind to generate the most fruit for a business. User experience is exactly what it sounds like: a user’s emotions and attitudes about a product, system or service.

Okay. So, that’s old news. At the time of this writing, Drupal 8 (D8) has been Production-ready for just over two years. So, the question is no longer, “Is Drupal 8 ready for my Production site?” Instead, the question is, “When should I move to Drupal 8?” The ideal answer is - before you do any more major work to your existing site. (Of course, if you are readying to build a site from scratch then you should start with D8.)

Excellent user experience (UX) is a major part of what makes an online business interaction a customer service win. A multitude of companies and services are at the fingertips of anyone who owns a computer or smartphone - 24 hours a day. If a visitor has to spend a long time trying to utilize the information or services on a website... well, they just won’t. They will move on to a competitor whose website meets their needs.

Why is Website Development so Important for SEO?

Everyday, millions of people use search engines (such as Google and Bing) to find information. Most company websites exist because they have answers, solutions and services people need. How can a company increase the odds their information will be shown in search engine results pages (SERP)? If many websites offer the same information, the better-optimized site is more likely to get more visitors.

Boston Web Development Team Chooses Drupal for the Future

More than 7 million people come to Boston.gov annually to access city services but the old technology and clunky design wasn’t helping the public or the city employees save time. It was time for a redesign. Boston public servants wanted to deliver a site to the public that was adaptable, user-friendly, and would evolve with the needs of it’s constituents.